North

Southbank Centre receives redesigned visual identity from North

Southbank Centre’s in-house design team has worked with North on redesigning the institution’s visual identity. This whole new refreshed identity undergoes a new logotype, design framework and typographic expression. The new visual identity is applied to all aspects of the branding and identity of the institution, which includes signage to tickets, posters and the website.

North’s founding partner Sean Perkins describes that:

The new identity clearly, confidently and consistently communicates ‘Southbank Centre’ like a title of a magazine – everything else is the weekly, monthly features and highlights, the content.

With what Perkins describes of about the new visual identity is clearly exampled with the images below, and certainly with the refreshed logotype. The logotype certainly obtains the look and feel of a magazine, especially with how the content for the institution is regulary updated on a weekly basis. The mixture of the instutition’s content with the logotype and new identity, they certainly work seamlessly together.

At the time of writing, Southbank Centre is undergoing a major renovation, so the timing of a new refreshed visual identity works well. With this major renovation in mind, the institution wanted an “impactful and distinctive” new visual language, as well as being the largest and culture and arts centre in Europe. Therefore, the identity redesign opted in for the colour yellow has the core colour identity. This creates a sense of creativity and optimism to the institution and across the visual identity. This works with what the centre is about, culture and arts. With the logotype used, the institution used the Noe Display font (from type foundry, Schick Toikka: “a modern, high-contrast serif font) and customised it to visually reference the centre’s iconic building. Southbank Centre also reasons that the customised Noe Display font creates:

an ownable, recognisable typographic tone of voice

North’s Charlie De Grussa also says:

The logotype design and serif font choice was inspired by Southbank Centre’s brutalist architecture and the original Festival of Britain identity.”

De Grussa goes on to say:

This visual language reference runs throughout the identity applications, typography and wayfinding elements.

What I can take in for inspiration from this new redesign identity for Southbank Centre, is the combination of colour choice, font choice and the actual content from the centre. The smart choice between colour and font, combined with centre’s content seamlessly works well together, providing a comteporary look and feel, which fulfills the centre’s original motive of being impactful and distinctive. Also, what I can take in for inspiration is the considered use of the centre’s iconic building that influence and referenced into the visual identity. This I can take in to help with ideas and concepts.

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Southbank Centre

North

It’s Nice That

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The Partners

Brooklyn Symphony Orchestra receives rebrand from The Partners

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Working in there New York office, design agency The Partners, has rebranded Brooklyn’s symphony orchestra’s logo, stating that the new logo describes as “music made visual”. The new logo design is a complete overhaul compared to the 2003 logo, stripping the full name and Brooklyn Bridge silhouette, to concentrating on the intials of the name, but with some creative thinking behind the design.

“The design of each letter exemplifies an individual aspect of the orchestra, the agency explains. The blocky “B” is representative of Brooklyn, “robust, industrial and iconic”. The more delicate, serif “S” stands for great music, “elegant, dynamic and expressive”. The “O” is made up of a collection of dots, to symbolise the community of musicians, “convergent, complementary and collaborative”.”

The creative thinking behind the intial letters design is unique and strong, as taking representation for each intial gives the logo some character, and creating a sense of recognition. Each of the letter designs is effective and works well, as each letter does represent the reasoning behind it, from the design agency.

Although the design agency has rebranded Brooklyn’s symphony orchestra, the agency is also working on developing software too. The software is to visualise music interpretations in real time, and so the agency will be creating graphics to go along with that development, as well as the symphony orchestra’s digital platforms.

The design team says that the identity:

brings dynamism and freshness to the presentation of music that transcends the time it was written

Artistic director at BSO, Nick Armstrong comments on the agency’s rebrand work:

The Partners’ work has yielded an exciting, contemporary resource for us, which brings together a graphical logo, and a dynamic use of that logo which the BSO will use in its marketing.

As well as the rebranded logo, other visuals within BSO has also received an overhaul of wonderful design. Such exmaples include the poster designs and marketing materials. In the poster designs, the use of shape and colour typically reflects on the logo design, symbolic and abstract. The combination of the coomposition, shape and colour, gives the poster design, and the BSO as a whole, a contemporary feel and look, even though the content of the orchestra, is primarily traditional and hundreds of years old. The colour choices and shapes gives the orchestra an opening for a new audience, as well as their exisiting one, as these visuals certainly attract a younger audience.

What I can take from this as inspiration from my own work is the creative thinking behind the logo design, as well as the strong use of shape and colour. Creating represtional symbols in the logo can be a strong effective solution, which I could incorporate into my own logo design projects. As well as the logo, the strong effective use of shape and colour can also be taken into consideration. The shape and colour used in BSO’s poster designs and marketing materials open up the subject and content of the orchestra in a clean and contemporary look and feel. I can use this forward thinking into my own poster and material designs.

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The Partners

It’s Nice That

Kodak (Work-Order)

Kodak returns to original vintage logo identity

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Reverting to its original symbol logo design, Kodak is the latest company to undergo a retro branding. 34 years of the original symbol, the Kodak “K” is back, originally designed by Peter J. Oestreich in 1971. In 2006, Kodak removed the symbol and simply display the company’s name in the logo design. However, Work-Order has designed the logo to be stacked capitalised type for the word Kodak inside the letterform.

“Capitalising the type is “the clearest departure from the past” says Work-Order, as Kodak has always used lower case. “The symmetry of the capital letterforms creates a molecular flexibility that allows the wordmark to be stacked,” says the design studio. “It is reminiscent of film perforations and street signage. It acts as a manufacturer’s stamp: the logo is the first read and the name is the supporting mark. When small, the name is removed leaving just the icon.”

The same colour palette is used, identifying and acknowledging the company’s trademark colours. Also, the trademarked yellow and red is consistently and effectively utilised throughout all materials and media for the company, such as the packaging and identity design.

What I can take from this as inspiration for my own work is the strong use of colour and symbolic logo design. A strong symbol logo, with strong colours can turn a logo design into a legacy design, that in turn, could stay strong for a number of years, creating a trademark. Also, I could take the simplicity of the logo design in consideration, as it’s strong in shape, not overcomplicated.

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Work-Order (Kodak)

It’s Nice That

Craig & Karl

Berlin’s Bread & Butter gets a new identity design from Craig & Karl

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Craig & Karl has designed a new identity for Bread & Butter in Berlin, encompassing around the event’s theme of Now. Craig & Karl utilised array of iconic graphics, with eye=popping colours, reminiscent of the Bauhaus movement.

Part of Bread & Butter’s new identity, the new branding involved the areas of fashion, music, food and Berlin itself, to integrate together with the bright, bold identity. The new identity design has also been appeared and utilise throughout various combinations, such as campaign imagery to website, signage and merchandise.

The icons certainly bring an essential liveliness and diversity to the identity and event as a whole.

The bold, bright and block-like graphics and colours gives the identity design a neutral feel and look, attracting a young audience primarily. The iconic graphics utilise influence from modern emojis, creating simple icons with flat colours. These elements work well across the whole identity, as the emoji-like icons, combined with the bright bold colours, gives the identity design a fresh, modern look and feel. The use of an all caps sans-serif font adds the simplicity to the identity design, not making it too overcomplicated, and more memorable for the viewer/audience.

What I can take from this as inspiration for my own work is the use of strong, bright bold colour choices, as well as the use of props, signage and merchandising materials. Keeping the props, signage and merchandising materials in mind with a identity design project, this will help judge what a design will look like, outside of screen and print imagery, and into the real world of visual communication. I can also take the effective use of the shapes created from the identity design as inspiration as well.

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Craig & Karl

Creative Boom

FutureBrand

NatWest’s redesigned identity and logo, from FutureBrand, returns to the 1968 “cubes”

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Basing on the original 1968 3D logo, FutureBrand has redesigned the renowned bank firm’s visual identity and logo.

The original design of the three interlocking cubes was to represent the fusion of three banks coming together, as the design agency explains, however, the existing logo was a simplified and flattened version of that form.

FutureBrand has revived the original icon back by adding a 3D element to it – the use of shadows to the shapes. As well as the 3D element, the design agency has also consistently used the cube conecpt throughout the identity and branding, keeping it neat and subtle. To supply the new identity and branding visual, an illustrative cuboid typeface has been designed, as well as flat-style illustrations. The cuboid typeface directly links to the icon logo of the 3D element, utilising eye-popping colour. The illustrations and other branding materials utilise the same colour scheme and block-like forms, linking back to the original icon and to keep the sublte consistency.

Dan Witchell, FutureBrand executive creative director and creative lead on the project explains:

We wanted to create an identity system that was unique to NatWest and to do that we needed a brand asset that was already their own, however hidden or historical,

Witchell goes on:

We found the reference to the cubes in the RBS archive from 1968 and it gave us the sort of device we were looking for. It means that even if you don’t see the logo, you see cubes and that tells you instantly that it’s NatWest, a subconscious yet direct link back to the logo.

The idea and concept of creating the new logo to the original 1968 icon was a strong choice, as the image and visual identity of NatWest is common and well-known now, so many people can easily and quickly identity the firm behind the new 3D logo.

The typeface, illustrations and branding materials are also created strongly in correlation with the new visual identity, as they maintain the visual sense and consistency. They also work great as the colour scheme choice and illustration style gives the bank’s visual identity a modern sense of feel and look – something to attract and engage a young audience to.

What I can take from this as inspiration for my own work is the use of giving a modern look on a existing image. The limited colour choice and illustrations to go with a rebrand/new visual identity can also be taken in to consider and inspire, as these elements for a identity/branding project helps the aim for a firm/brand to be identified.

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As well as designing the new visual identity of NatWest, FutureBrand also redesigned the visual identity for the Royal Bank of Scotland. The visual form relates and is influenced from Scottish patterns of tweeds and tartans. Creating a fusion of contemporary and tradition, the new visual identity utilises traditional fabric patterns and contemporary colours, generating its own RBS pattern:

the Royal Bank tweel… a subtle nod to its Scottish heritage that runs through all brand communications“.

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FutureBrand

It’s Nice That

OK-RM

OK-RM-Antenne-Book-its-nice-that-listAntenne Books gets new and effective identity from OK-RM

Independent London-based bookstore, Antenne Books, has undertaken a minimal and bold new identity. The new, fresh yet effective identity from OK-RM, maintains a visualisation of a modern feel, with the established and traditions of a bookstore. The identity is clean, simple and maintains a refined look and feel throughout the bookstore’s assets, including stationery, packaging and their neat, refreshed user-friendly website. Utilising a clean bold typographic approach, OK-RM has effectively and succesfully conveyed their intentions of enhancing the bookstore to the products that they offer and sell. Antenne Books covers national and global publications, including the visual and communication topics of art, photography, design, illsutration, theory, writing, fashion and culture.

OK-RM says:

The main objective of the project is to provide Antenne with a clear and functional platform for displaying and offering its publications to a growing audience

OK-RM goes on to elaborate their intention:

The expression of this function is rooted in primary simplicity, evident in the colour palette and navigational devices. This same attitude inspires the new acronym AB.C deriving from ‘Antenne Books’ and also the ‘dot com’ – a signal to the digital-centric offer.

What I can take in for inspiration from this identity design project, is the effective use of simplicity. Not every idea or design has to be full or busy with detail, as sometimes, the best solutions is to go simple and minimal. In this identity design, the simplicity works effectively well, as the visualisation of it is memorable, and rather understandable, once the viewer knows about the independent bookstore. The simplicity objective also runs through the colour palette, quite evidently, and so this can also taken as inspiration. Subtle colours work well against a simple identity, as it runs the intention of the designer through well.

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It’s Nice That

OK-RM

Sebastian Roitter

Sebastian Roitter’s extensive and fresh identity design for a fictional film festival: Festocalipsis

For the fictional outdoor film festival, Festocalipsis, Argentinian designer Sebastian Roitter has created the identity fresh and light, covering themes of the ‘end of the world’, as well as apocalyptic-themed films to an exhibition about world disasters. Festocalipsis is a fictional film festival all about the end of the world.

To include with Roitter’s identity design, he has also produced a few merchandising elements to neatly go with the identity and festival. Roitter has created a film programme, posters, pamphlets, name badges and other branded merchandise for the project.

From It’s Nice That:

Not only is the scope of what Sebastian has designed impressive, it’s the thought he’s poured into the content that actually makes up the fictional festival. A mix of typography and inky illustrations (drawn by the designer) create a contrast between order and chaos. This meshes well with the ominous undertones of the festival and flashes of yellow, red and purple lighten the mood across what could easily become a very bleak project.

The combination of different elements together, brings Roitter’s design approach out towards the viewer and audience very clearly, and engagingly well. Roitter’s typography, illustrations and colour choices all work well together, merging his unique and appealing visual style to the identity project.

Another pivotal point to bring out on Roitter’s identity design project is his layout choices for the printed merchandising, as well as other relatable merchandising elements. His layout choices for the film programme, posters and pamphlets in particular, are bold, visually appealing, and informative. The mixture of his typography and illustrations, along with the negative space that he cleverly utilises, creates the printed pieces to be engaging and appealing for the viewer and audience to view and read. The colour choices aren’t ‘in your face’ and complement well with the layout, negative space and Roitter’s illustrations. The use of the sans-serif typeface creates a contemporary sense to it, as if Roitter had the decision of using a serif typeface, even the combination of the two different typefaces, it would create a sense of traditional feeling of the festival.

What I can take from Roitter’s identity design is the effective use of his layout technique, his use of typograhy and illustration style. Taking these elements in will be helpful for myself, when considering and generating ideas for a identity brief/project. The use of bold, flat colours is another aspect of the identity design that I like too. The colours aren’t mixed, or complicated, just simple bold colours. This brings great contrast between two or more colours, and with the negative white space. I can also take this process in for inspiration as well.

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It’s Nice That

Sebastian Roitter