Daniél Niederkofler

Italian club night Soul Juice receive’s designs from Daniél Niederkofler

Soul Juice club in Brunico, Italy, receives playful artwork design from Daniél Niederkofler. The ethos that Soul Juice follows for it’s club nights are:

Forget the outside world and dance without worries

However, this idea is the premise behind’s Soul Juice’s:

founded in a necessity for an open minded space where people could enjoy themselves

Niederkofler demostrates his visual communication interests in graphic design, animation and illustration through each night at Soul Juice, as he creates and designs artwork that utilises strong line art illustrations, complemented with a candy-like colour palette. His playful approach with his artwork also examples acid house smileys, pizza slices and bowling bowls. These illustrations references Niederkofler’s creative design approach:

I like to create work that is funny, bold and somehow weird

From It’s Nice That:

Asked to contribute by the founders of the collective, its title was the designer’s first creation with the team and raw sketches of a creative direction followed. “The design we chose is influenced by African LP covers and retro games,” he explains.“The graphic is based on a simple grid, creating a modular system that gives me the freedom to create a range of variations.” Each poster is designed around the centre, “always a main element that connects to the collectives name”. From there,“the colour palette refers to the idea of a vibrant environment. The modules are filled with information and secondary elements like patterns and other symbols”.

What I can take in for inspiration for my own design work is Niederkofler’s creative design approach of: funny, bold and somehow weird. Taking in this approach certainly results in artwork and designs in a playful and fun output. Especially with the use of typography, colour choice and illustration style.

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Daniél Niederkofler

It’s Nice That

H.Y.T. Studio

H.Y.T. Studio showcases Yes Fam! Great graphic design

Creative Pathways PDP 10

Artist and designer, John Slade, showcases his commerical work through the graphic design studio, H.Y.T.. The graphic design studio’s clients revolve around the big names of Tate Modern, Transport for London and Channel Four.

The studio’s aim for their work output is considered to be stylistic choice of Slade’s enjoyment:

bold, striking, often conceptual graphics and illustrations.

This aim is evident with the recent works for club night Vesuvio at The Social, run by Heavenly Recordings, a London bar.

The recent works range from posters, flyers, GIFs and stickers, which are all designed and rendered with bright, bold contrasting colours, along with strong use of typography. Vitality is key with these series of works, as utilising a primary colour palette, each of the different works replicates, or even emulates how the feeling and visuals of a club night is like.

Futher works have been included with this series, as H.Y.T. has just opened an exhibition of its own works at The Social, called Pass The Hot Sauce.

The visual feeling and mood of these series of works are contemporary and trendy, and especially how the works are for a night club, this certainly conveys that to the viewer/audience. The works contain simple compositions, simple shapes and lines, which all work towards that feeling of a club night emulation.

What I can take from these works as inspiration for my own work is the strong use of colour, shape and typograhy. These elemements work great together, so taking this into my own work, I will be able to design and create visually and emotionally engaging pieces of design work.

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H.Y.T. Studio

It’s Nice That

Okuyama Taiki

Designer Okuyama Taiki design experimental posters, that encourages you to “play freely”

Creative Pathways PDP Entry 08

Tokyo-based designer, Okuyama Taiki has created these experimental, unusual posters, that play with typography, shape and colour. His latest works are available on his blogging site, Nochigo Source, which users are able to download Taiki’s poster work, and edit themselves in their native file formats, .psd and/or .ai. This makes Taiki encourage users to “play freely” with his latest works.

The posters themselves are playful and abstract, covering a minds thought of being creative.

This pick’n’mix attitude is mimicked in Okuyama’s work with his sporadic use of abstract icons with the odd flash of type that come together to make odd graphic illustrations.

What I can take from this as inspiration for my own work is the experimental and abstract use of typography, shape and colour. I could use this approach as an alternative, experimental and playful method, when creating posters for a campaign or brief. As well as the still posters, I could also play with the interactivity side, such as the moving image posters that Taiki has produced. This creates and reveals more information, which can be an advantage.

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Okuyama Taiki

It’s Nice That

Adam & Eve/DDB and Pâté

Adam & Eve/DDB and Pâté launches The Telegraph’s new app, Think Ahead

Creative Pathways PDP Entry 05

The Telegraph, has release an new app, called Think Ahead, with creative agency Blink Art’s Pâté (Paul Pateman) and communications agency, Adam&EveDDB. The new launched app is in relation to the Think Ahead campaign, that:

The campaign challenges viewers to consider what “Think ahead” means to them and accompanies the launch of the new Telegraph app.”

Blink Art of the campaign says:

Pâté’s direction was invaluable in each stage of the creative,

Blink Art goes on to say:

He even stepped into the sound studio and performed the voice of Donald Trump!

Focusing around the name, “Think Ahead”, the campaign aims to ask people how to define the phrase. Utilising display, video and social media, the campaign engages with the audience through great visual communication.

The colour choices for the displays are vibrant and bold, clashing aganist each other, creating a eye-popping visual for the audience and viewer. This creates engagement and viewer’s asking themselves of what the content asks. The illustrations are simple and effective, relating to the text and questions provided on the top of each display. It’s punchy, bold and attracts an array of youth and old.

With the video, the concept is consistently used with the colour and moving-image illustrations. It is playful, reflecting a fun alternative on the quite serious case of the US presidency situation.

The app itself includes a Top Stories channel, story notifications and a scrolling news format where stories become “cards”. Luke Griffiths, The Telegraph’s digital designer explains “we have hired designers to interpret the news as it comes through to our top stories. It is a collaborative workflow between designers and editors in the newsroom.”

What I can take from this as inspiration for my own work is the effective use of simple text and words, combined with strong illustrated imagery. Creating that relation with word and image towards the audience can make a strong difference with a poor and great relation – succesfully combining the two will generate a strong outcome and reflection. As well as the layout, the flat-style illustration can also be taken into consideration, as this illustration style is trendy and popular, as it can generate quick, easily understandable images with non-complicated shapes and colours.

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Adam & Eve/DDB

Pâté

It’s Nice That

Animade

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Animade showcases new, appealing interactive web game-experiment

Everyone’s favourite London animation studio, Animade, has created an interactive web experiment called Party Pooper. The aim of the fun, simple game is to remove the bunch of strange guests within the room, using the various tools laying around. The simple aim of the game is remisicent of many point-and-click online games.

The game consists of various characters that have simple “bopping” movements. This creates the characters to have a sense of likeable characteristics, combined with the simple shape and bold colours. The animations for each character’s removal from the room is also thoughtfully creative, so the viewer is actively engaged with it. The user has simple tasks of using the various tools to clear the room, and such tools include scissors, duct tape and a hammer.

Designed and animated by Animade’s own Milo Targett, the characters are simple yet brilliant — just block-colour shapes given heaps of personality via their subtly different eyes and ways of moving. Development was by Simon Neveu. The backing tracks by Prince Lucien and Big Cool Slug are the icing on the cake.

What I can take from Animade’s fun and playful web experiment game for inspiration into my own work is the consistent use of colour, shape and character design, which is consistently used throughout many of Animade’s projects. Utilising this consistency helps build up the design style prescence of the studio, and makes it easily and quickly recognisable for what studio the project has originated from. I could use this method of consistency into my own work and portfolio, so I can build my own design prescnece strongly with my own design style, thought, ideas and outputs.

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It’s Nice That

Party Pooper

Animade