Daniél Niederkofler

Italian club night Soul Juice receive’s designs from Daniél Niederkofler

Soul Juice club in Brunico, Italy, receives playful artwork design from Daniél Niederkofler. The ethos that Soul Juice follows for it’s club nights are:

Forget the outside world and dance without worries

However, this idea is the premise behind’s Soul Juice’s:

founded in a necessity for an open minded space where people could enjoy themselves

Niederkofler demostrates his visual communication interests in graphic design, animation and illustration through each night at Soul Juice, as he creates and designs artwork that utilises strong line art illustrations, complemented with a candy-like colour palette. His playful approach with his artwork also examples acid house smileys, pizza slices and bowling bowls. These illustrations references Niederkofler’s creative design approach:

I like to create work that is funny, bold and somehow weird

From It’s Nice That:

Asked to contribute by the founders of the collective, its title was the designer’s first creation with the team and raw sketches of a creative direction followed. “The design we chose is influenced by African LP covers and retro games,” he explains.“The graphic is based on a simple grid, creating a modular system that gives me the freedom to create a range of variations.” Each poster is designed around the centre, “always a main element that connects to the collectives name”. From there,“the colour palette refers to the idea of a vibrant environment. The modules are filled with information and secondary elements like patterns and other symbols”.

What I can take in for inspiration for my own design work is Niederkofler’s creative design approach of: funny, bold and somehow weird. Taking in this approach certainly results in artwork and designs in a playful and fun output. Especially with the use of typography, colour choice and illustration style.

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Daniél Niederkofler

It’s Nice That

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North

Southbank Centre receives redesigned visual identity from North

Southbank Centre’s in-house design team has worked with North on redesigning the institution’s visual identity. This whole new refreshed identity undergoes a new logotype, design framework and typographic expression. The new visual identity is applied to all aspects of the branding and identity of the institution, which includes signage to tickets, posters and the website.

North’s founding partner Sean Perkins describes that:

The new identity clearly, confidently and consistently communicates ‘Southbank Centre’ like a title of a magazine – everything else is the weekly, monthly features and highlights, the content.

With what Perkins describes of about the new visual identity is clearly exampled with the images below, and certainly with the refreshed logotype. The logotype certainly obtains the look and feel of a magazine, especially with how the content for the institution is regulary updated on a weekly basis. The mixture of the instutition’s content with the logotype and new identity, they certainly work seamlessly together.

At the time of writing, Southbank Centre is undergoing a major renovation, so the timing of a new refreshed visual identity works well. With this major renovation in mind, the institution wanted an “impactful and distinctive” new visual language, as well as being the largest and culture and arts centre in Europe. Therefore, the identity redesign opted in for the colour yellow has the core colour identity. This creates a sense of creativity and optimism to the institution and across the visual identity. This works with what the centre is about, culture and arts. With the logotype used, the institution used the Noe Display font (from type foundry, Schick Toikka: “a modern, high-contrast serif font) and customised it to visually reference the centre’s iconic building. Southbank Centre also reasons that the customised Noe Display font creates:

an ownable, recognisable typographic tone of voice

North’s Charlie De Grussa also says:

The logotype design and serif font choice was inspired by Southbank Centre’s brutalist architecture and the original Festival of Britain identity.”

De Grussa goes on to say:

This visual language reference runs throughout the identity applications, typography and wayfinding elements.

What I can take in for inspiration from this new redesign identity for Southbank Centre, is the combination of colour choice, font choice and the actual content from the centre. The smart choice between colour and font, combined with centre’s content seamlessly works well together, providing a comteporary look and feel, which fulfills the centre’s original motive of being impactful and distinctive. Also, what I can take in for inspiration is the considered use of the centre’s iconic building that influence and referenced into the visual identity. This I can take in to help with ideas and concepts.

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Southbank Centre

North

It’s Nice That

H.Y.T. Studio

H.Y.T. Studio showcases Yes Fam! Great graphic design

Creative Pathways PDP 10

Artist and designer, John Slade, showcases his commerical work through the graphic design studio, H.Y.T.. The graphic design studio’s clients revolve around the big names of Tate Modern, Transport for London and Channel Four.

The studio’s aim for their work output is considered to be stylistic choice of Slade’s enjoyment:

bold, striking, often conceptual graphics and illustrations.

This aim is evident with the recent works for club night Vesuvio at The Social, run by Heavenly Recordings, a London bar.

The recent works range from posters, flyers, GIFs and stickers, which are all designed and rendered with bright, bold contrasting colours, along with strong use of typography. Vitality is key with these series of works, as utilising a primary colour palette, each of the different works replicates, or even emulates how the feeling and visuals of a club night is like.

Futher works have been included with this series, as H.Y.T. has just opened an exhibition of its own works at The Social, called Pass The Hot Sauce.

The visual feeling and mood of these series of works are contemporary and trendy, and especially how the works are for a night club, this certainly conveys that to the viewer/audience. The works contain simple compositions, simple shapes and lines, which all work towards that feeling of a club night emulation.

What I can take from these works as inspiration for my own work is the strong use of colour, shape and typograhy. These elemements work great together, so taking this into my own work, I will be able to design and create visually and emotionally engaging pieces of design work.

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H.Y.T. Studio

It’s Nice That

Ill-Studio

L’Officiel magazine recieves new look from Ill-Studio

Creative Pathways PDP Entry 09

Parisian multidisciplinary studio, Ill-Studio has worked with the renowned fashion magazine L’Officiel de la couture et de la mode de Paris, or more commonly known as L’Officiel. The Parisian studio took over the creative and art direction for the fashion magazine. With Ill-Studio in charge with the creative and art direction, there first issue was released in October, also marking the fashion magazine’s 95th anniversary issue. As well as marking as the first issue released from the Parisian studio, it was also accompanied with an exhibition at the VNH Gallery, in Paris.

The redesign marked a striking departure from the magazine’s previously conventional template.

Ill-Studio worked on a three cover page magazine on their debut, consisting of three fashion icons: Lou Doillon, Iris Apfel and Damaris Goddrie. They were shot on a Samsung Galaxy wearing Fendi against a featureless studio backdrop. Then the images were simply boxed out with an off-kilter rectangle, and framed with thick borders in three pastel-like colours of postbox red, tangerine and violet.

Inside, Ill-Studio collaborated with a bumper pack of photographers including Jeremy Liebman, Edouard Plongeon, Osma Harvilahthi, Christiani-Toubiana, Raffaele Cariou and Henrik Purienne.

The typeface used on the cover pages feels and looks traditional to a fashion magazine, yet a contemporary feel to it simutaenously. The use of the serif type creates that traditional feeling, as the layout of the image, frame and colour provides the contemporary feel. The layout of the image, frame, colour and type is simple, easy to understand and effective. It is not overloading with unnecessary information, pretty much straight to the point of the magazine.

Moving onto the double page spreads, the layout is minimal, direct and traditional. The use of type gives the impression of a traditional feel, whilst the image placements gives the spreads the minimal, yet contemporary feel.

What I can take from Ill-Studio’s creative and art direction work as inspiration for my own work is the layout and cover page design. Both designs are strong and work well with the fashion magazine’s content. This can be applied to a current project of designing a fashion magazine with Comic Sans as the font.

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Ill-Studio

It’s Nice That

Craig & Karl

Berlin’s Bread & Butter gets a new identity design from Craig & Karl

Creative Pathways PDP Entry 04

Craig & Karl has designed a new identity for Bread & Butter in Berlin, encompassing around the event’s theme of Now. Craig & Karl utilised array of iconic graphics, with eye=popping colours, reminiscent of the Bauhaus movement.

Part of Bread & Butter’s new identity, the new branding involved the areas of fashion, music, food and Berlin itself, to integrate together with the bright, bold identity. The new identity design has also been appeared and utilise throughout various combinations, such as campaign imagery to website, signage and merchandise.

The icons certainly bring an essential liveliness and diversity to the identity and event as a whole.

The bold, bright and block-like graphics and colours gives the identity design a neutral feel and look, attracting a young audience primarily. The iconic graphics utilise influence from modern emojis, creating simple icons with flat colours. These elements work well across the whole identity, as the emoji-like icons, combined with the bright bold colours, gives the identity design a fresh, modern look and feel. The use of an all caps sans-serif font adds the simplicity to the identity design, not making it too overcomplicated, and more memorable for the viewer/audience.

What I can take from this as inspiration for my own work is the use of strong, bright bold colour choices, as well as the use of props, signage and merchandising materials. Keeping the props, signage and merchandising materials in mind with a identity design project, this will help judge what a design will look like, outside of screen and print imagery, and into the real world of visual communication. I can also take the effective use of the shapes created from the identity design as inspiration as well.

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Craig & Karl

Creative Boom

FutureBrand

NatWest’s redesigned identity and logo, from FutureBrand, returns to the 1968 “cubes”

Creative Pathways PDP Entry 03

Basing on the original 1968 3D logo, FutureBrand has redesigned the renowned bank firm’s visual identity and logo.

The original design of the three interlocking cubes was to represent the fusion of three banks coming together, as the design agency explains, however, the existing logo was a simplified and flattened version of that form.

FutureBrand has revived the original icon back by adding a 3D element to it – the use of shadows to the shapes. As well as the 3D element, the design agency has also consistently used the cube conecpt throughout the identity and branding, keeping it neat and subtle. To supply the new identity and branding visual, an illustrative cuboid typeface has been designed, as well as flat-style illustrations. The cuboid typeface directly links to the icon logo of the 3D element, utilising eye-popping colour. The illustrations and other branding materials utilise the same colour scheme and block-like forms, linking back to the original icon and to keep the sublte consistency.

Dan Witchell, FutureBrand executive creative director and creative lead on the project explains:

We wanted to create an identity system that was unique to NatWest and to do that we needed a brand asset that was already their own, however hidden or historical,

Witchell goes on:

We found the reference to the cubes in the RBS archive from 1968 and it gave us the sort of device we were looking for. It means that even if you don’t see the logo, you see cubes and that tells you instantly that it’s NatWest, a subconscious yet direct link back to the logo.

The idea and concept of creating the new logo to the original 1968 icon was a strong choice, as the image and visual identity of NatWest is common and well-known now, so many people can easily and quickly identity the firm behind the new 3D logo.

The typeface, illustrations and branding materials are also created strongly in correlation with the new visual identity, as they maintain the visual sense and consistency. They also work great as the colour scheme choice and illustration style gives the bank’s visual identity a modern sense of feel and look – something to attract and engage a young audience to.

What I can take from this as inspiration for my own work is the use of giving a modern look on a existing image. The limited colour choice and illustrations to go with a rebrand/new visual identity can also be taken in to consider and inspire, as these elements for a identity/branding project helps the aim for a firm/brand to be identified.

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As well as designing the new visual identity of NatWest, FutureBrand also redesigned the visual identity for the Royal Bank of Scotland. The visual form relates and is influenced from Scottish patterns of tweeds and tartans. Creating a fusion of contemporary and tradition, the new visual identity utilises traditional fabric patterns and contemporary colours, generating its own RBS pattern:

the Royal Bank tweel… a subtle nod to its Scottish heritage that runs through all brand communications“.

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FutureBrand

It’s Nice That

Quim Marin

New Spanish club, Why Not receives bold identity from Quim Marin

Creative Pathways PDP Entry 01

Barcelona-based designer, Quim Marin has worked on the new identity design on Why Not, based in Girona, using a array of bold aesthetics and simplicity. With his past experience working within the music industry’s events, festivals and brands, Marin has this new identity design under his belt – a logical choice for a new club brand. His 15 years of crafting experience in identites and advertising campaigns in the music industry certainly maintains his visual style to this day, as his new identity work examples that.

The Spanish club needed a new brand identity for its October launch, consisting of brand materials to exemplify that, such as marekting materials, posters, canvas bags, t-shirts and billboards ads.

Quim founded his career working for a number of Barcelona design studios – Dotstation, Tmtfactory and Suki Design – before venturing out on his own to become a freelance art director and designer.

Looking through Marin’s work for Why Not, he consistenly uses bold colours, on a limited colour palette. A mixture of pastel-like colours combined with a deep navy hue, creates a sense of a modern, new feel of a club.

The use of typography in the identity works well with the other aesthetics too, as the combination of a bold sans-serif font, with a traditional serif font creates the sense of tradition, merged with a modern feel. The mixture of a sans-serif and serif font works better together, as a designer’s view, they work in harmony. Another reason why the serif font works well with this identity design, is that the serif font works great in the Spanish language, as the language is closely visually related to Latin, which serif fonts work great as well.

The marketing materials also have a trendy style of simplicity and repetition on the t-shirt and canvas bag design. They are not over complicated, and consist of a simple, striking image, that can be memorised as the brand identity for the club.

What I can take from Marin’s recent identity design work as inspiration for my own work is his bold style of type and limited colours that can produce an striking image for a brand. The combination of sans-serif and serif fonts is also a positive aethestic to take in, as the combination works great, creating a slight differentiation than all sans-serif or all serif type.

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View the project on Behance

Quim Marin

Creative Boom